Back to Post :Leather Chair Armrest Covers

leather chair armrest covers 7

leather chair armrest covers 7

Please share to download

graphic leather chair armrest covers 7
impression leather chair armrest covers 7

Our adopted kittens decided to amuse themselves one afternoon, chewing the piping off of the seam of one of the arms of my Pottery Barn sofa - I about had a heart attack when I got home. Replacing the sofa was not an option. After looking around on line for armrest covers, and discovering they were about $60.00 + a piece, I about had another heart attack! Hoping for a less expensive option, I checked Walmart, online, and discovered these armrest covers. I would rate these covers as "fine." The fabric is a good beige neutral, in that kind of low-knap, fleece-like fabric, very thin, no lining. They are also very large, I assume to fit over the large, round, "rolled" style sofa arms that were popular a few years ago. They are too large for my sofa, but they just drape down the side, and look "ok." I think these are a great value for what they are, but the quality is pretty much on par for what you can expect to buy from Walmart. As I did not want to spend a lot of money on armrest covers, these did the trick. If you are looking for more of a custom fit, or a higher end fabric, you may be disappointed. The other thing, I don't recall that the specs identified that you get 2 per package. I accidently ordered 2 packages, and ended up with 4 covers. There are 2 per package.


How do you keep your sofa's arms clean? Throw the arm covers in the wash! Order your sofa arm covers from today! Armrest covers are the ultimate gears made to protect the arms of your sofa. From tiny slip ups like stains or your evil cat, this is an excellent form of protection for your sofa. Comfort Works make armrest covers of various sizes, depending on the type of armrest your sofa has. These arm protectors come in all of our fabrics except the leather (Modena and Urbanskin).


jones4leather - 18 Nov 2014 #6 Ekornes will sell new armrests, but not all styles and colors are available, as you have discovered. Many upholsterers don't like to sew leather; it is a specialty skill and best done with an industrial machine made for sewing leather, so most avoid or do not sew leather at all. They must purchase leather in large pieces or full hides and it will not match, So a small job is not cost effective. Many Ekornes armrest designs are harder to sew than a t-shaped seat cushion with piping and take as long or longer to do. Small items have a lot of tight curves, which are slow and fussy to sew; Some Ekornes designs are actually made of a pillow inside a pillow, fitted together in a certain order, so the upholsterer has to reverse engineer it. which can be a challange. This is why the labor is expensive for what seems like a small thing. A pair of armrests in a simple "hot dog" design can take an hour or 2 to do, while a very complicated pair can take twice that. Check with your local leather repair professional. Some will sew new ones and recolor the leather to match (this is what I do). Some will know an upholsterer who can sew the armrests, then the leather repair pro can do the recoloring. The whole recliner has usually faded with age or become darker from use, so the only way to get leather the right color is to have it custom colored. There is a DIY process for recoloring, but look for a supplier that will customize a kit for you. FYI: The reason most armrests need to be replaced is cracking and color loss due to body oils, which rot leather and accumulate over time, so damage accellerates exponentially with age. Also affects headrests. reply


Ekornes will sell new armrests, but not all styles and colors are available, as you have discovered. Many upholsterers don't like to sew leather; it is a specialty skill and best done with an industrial machine made for sewing leather, so most avoid or do not sew leather at all. They must purchase leather in large pieces or full hides and it will not match, So a small job is not cost effective. Many Ekornes armrest designs are harder to sew than a t-shaped seat cushion with piping and take as long or longer to do. Small items have a lot of tight curves, which are slow and fussy to sew; Some Ekornes designs are actually made of a pillow inside a pillow, fitted together in a certain order, so the upholsterer has to reverse engineer it. which can be a challange. This is why the labor is expensive for what seems like a small thing. A pair of armrests in a simple "hot dog" design can take an hour or 2 to do, while a very complicated pair can take twice that. Check with your local leather repair professional. Some will sew new ones and recolor the leather to match (this is what I do). Some will know an upholsterer who can sew the armrests, then the leather repair pro can do the recoloring. The whole recliner has usually faded with age or become darker from use, so the only way to get leather the right color is to have it custom colored. There is a DIY process for recoloring, but look for a supplier that will customize a kit for you. FYI: The reason most armrests need to be replaced is cracking and color loss due to body oils, which rot leather and accumulate over time, so damage accellerates exponentially with age. Also affects headrests.


We purchased 2 sets of the armrest covers for our new leather loveseat and sofa, to protect them from everyday dirt and stains from frequent use in south Florida (high humidity and sweat) which collected on our old fabric furniture. Unfortunately these don't hold to the leather arms and slip off. We took back the unopened set and making due with the other in addition to a kitchen dish towel which is longer and can be tucked into crease between the armrest and sofa back. These probably would work better on fabric, but not on smooth leather or other smooth materials.


Ekornes Chair Armrest repair or replacement rayworth - 19 Feb 2012 - 6 posts / 0 new Log in or register to post comments #1 I have an Ekornes Stressless recliner (leather) about 10 years old. The chair itself is in great condition, but the leather on the armrests is cracked and torn; too many sharp elbows for too many years, I suppose. I would like to repair, recover, or replace the armrests. Any suggestions? For your information: I have emailed Ekornes. No answer for over one week now! I have contacted my local dealer. No help there! I have contacted a local leather repair service, who may prove up to the job. They will give me an estimate in a week or so. So far I have not been able to find an upholstery shop that will recover the armrests in leather. Everybody wants to do the job in fabric rather than leather. Help! reply


If all else fails, I suppose that I could find a similar leather and make loose-fittting armrest covers. I would rather do that than glue something onto the armrests. In fact, I may make/get armrest covers even if the repair guy (if he shows up) can make a decent repair job.


I have an Ekornes Stressless recliner (leather) about 10 years old. The chair itself is in great condition, but the leather on the armrests is cracked and torn; too many sharp elbows for too many years, I suppose. I would like to repair, recover, or replace the armrests. Any suggestions? For your information: I have emailed Ekornes. No answer for over one week now! I have contacted my local dealer. No help there! I have contacted a local leather repair service, who may prove up to the job. They will give me an estimate in a week or so. So far I have not been able to find an upholstery shop that will recover the armrests in leather. Everybody wants to do the job in fabric rather than leather. Help!


rayworth - 24 Feb 2012 #5 Repair Made: not great, but good! Thanks for your post. I went to an authorised dealer and they supposedly contacted Ekornes to try to order replacement arms (or at least obtain a quote for repalcement arms). Ekornes would not quote a price for arm replacement according to the dealer; presumeably due to the age of the chair. I also emailed Ekornes direct and have received no answer in over 3 weeks. I removed the arms and carted them around to several upholstery shops. I only found one who would agree to to the job, but he wanted a ridulous price and assured me that the color match would probably not be acceptable to me. Perhaps, I should have shopped around and bought the leather myself then taken the leather and armrests to an upholstery shop, but I didn't I ended up going with a leather repair guy, who did an acceptable repair job (but far from great) at a price that was not out of sight. Now we will see if the repair job holds up. If not I will go shopping for leather and take it to an upholstery shop next time. Thanks again. reply